Bahubali 2
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Baahubali 2 Review: A new landmark set in VFX by Rajamouli

By Hindustan Times

SS Rajamouli’s biggest budget adventure, Baahubali 2: The Conclusion, comes alive in its colossal and ambitious imagination to complete the unfinished story of Baahubali. 
 
It lives and loves in mythical cities that touch the cloud created with awe-inspiring finesse.
 
Most importantly, why Kattappa killed Baahubali has been answered. The question in itself had the audience, catching an early morning show, on the edges of their seats but the fairytale of a story did have more to offer.
 
The imaginary city of Mahishmati now comes across richer and more fantastic with a new waterside view. There is a lot more in this fairytale world: A new city where Baahubali meets his future wife Devsena (Anushka Shetty), splendid views of a moonlit war there where cattle with fire in their horns fight the enemy, eagles carry messages and Disneyesque palatial ships that fly. There is an anthem for Mahishmati as well.
 
Such risk with such extravaganza is that one unconvincing moment fails an entire film. But Baahubali’s cinematography and craft leave no gaps. It is fair to say that it creates a new landmark for Indian cinema in convincing ‘special effects’.
 
The Conclusion begins seamlessly just where it left in the first movie with Kattappa narrating the story of Mahishmati. The scale rises soon enough as Baahubali enters the screen to tame an elephant gone wild with cheers from the audience as is wont of a superstar.
 
The grim and tight revenge drama, however, slacks in the first half with a long courtship episode with warrior princess Devasena as Kattappa turns into the archetypal comic sidekick for Baahubali.
 
The film gets back its pace with Devasena rejecting the marriage proposal of Bhallaladeva (Rana Daggubati) sent by the queen of Mahishmati - Sivagami. In a quick turn of events, Bhallaladeva becomes the king and Baahubali is made the army chief.
 
Baahubali’s cast has fit into the narrative so well that it will not be surprising if Daggubati, Sathyaraj or Prabhas are identified as Bhallaladeva, Kattappa or Baahubali for some time to come. Daggubati holds the screen together with his persona of the evil all powerful king and manages to hinge the tension around him. Ramya Krishnan is powerful as queen mother Sivagami.
 
The female characters, however, continue to disappoint as like princess Avanthika (Tamannah Bhatia) in the first part. Devasena too starts off as an ace warrior only to be tamed into someone who has to be protected. Shetty, however, pulls through a strong performance balancing an eerie tortured prisoner and a charming princess.
 
Baahubali is a delight for all those who enjoy cinema as a visual medium, there is not much else, though.